Yellowfin

yellowfin

How to accelerate your path to AI

Software vendors that are looking to accelerate their path to AI need to take advantage of the AI already in analytics platforms. Gartner believes that the future of analytics is augmented. That is, analytics will be AI-driven and all end-to-end use cases will be automated. I also believe it won’t be long before analytics is no longer on our desktops - instead it’ll be embedded in applications.

yellowfin

Part 2: How machine learning, AI and automation could break the BI adoption barrier

If, as we saw in part one of this series, 77% of businesses are 'definitely not' or 'probably not' using analytics to its full extent and the adoption rate of analytics platforms is an abysmal 32%, something drastic needs to happen. Can the era of augmented analytics with its machine learning and AI fix this adoption issue?

yellowfin

Why going global was the best thing we did

I often get asked why Yellowfin decided to go global. While the Australian market is relatively large, it’s also quite risk averse, which makes it a challenging market to sell into. While VC-backed software vendors have the benefit of selling to others within their VC family, as a bootstrapped startup we had to forge legitimate markets outside of Australia. We knew that we had to spread our wings to grow and expanding overseas quickly gave us the opportunity to sell faster.

yellowfin

Part 1: How machine learning, AI and automation could break the BI adoption barrier

Can we fix the plague in analytics with AI? Every Business Intelligence (BI) and analytics vendor is integrating a form of artificial intelligence (AI), machine learning algorithm (ML), and natural language generation (NLG) into their products. 'Augmented analytics', is the hot new topic and full of hype right now, but can it fix the fundamental flaw that has plagued BI tools for decades - adoption?

yellowfin

Don’t blame your people for not being data-driven, blame your technology

Recently, I read why companies are failing in their efforts to become data-driven in the Harvard Business Review. It said that 72% of Chief Data Officers believe their organization doesn't have a data culture and 92.5% of them blame their people. But I think they’re wrong. The real issue is that people aren’t using the tools that their CDOs have bought for them. That means the problem isn’t with the users, it’s with the technology they’ve been given.